home fire safety advice....

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Medusa
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Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2016 8:41 pm
Location: UK

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by Medusa » Sun Apr 26, 2020 8:58 pm

Thanks for this, great post!
Growing old disgracefully!

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 4703
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Sun Apr 26, 2020 9:55 pm

Medusa wrote:
Sun Apr 26, 2020 8:58 pm
Thanks for this, great post!
:)

People stuck at home more than ever at the moment not spending 8+ hours a day at work..... complacency or Bored children stuck at home.. it only takes one little slip and that lighter / box of matches becomes a great curiosity to little fingers.....

Had that brought home about 3 weeks ago when I got "daddy only daddy or mummy " yelled at me as little man (3) trots in to the living room and hands me a lighter which lives on top of the fridge freezer out of reach it must have been knocked off.. big grin .... Think the praise and sweeties did the trick as I then got handed my work boots... Phone..... Car keys .... As he hunted for something else that daddy would provide sweets for but he knows what he shouldn't have and passes it to me or Mrs a and awaits his praise /reward :lol:


The 9 yo has had a go with a old dry powder extinguisher and a small fire on the allotment so she has a basic understanding of what the red bottles on the wall do... We did have a rough week with her after we had a electric chip pan fire the other year worrying but between me and the crew at the local fire station we put her mind to rest
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

Tankford
Posts: 34
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2020 10:17 pm

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by Tankford » Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:10 am

Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 8:34 pm
-Snip-
Love your setup, pretty much what I use - I didn't see a carbon monoxide alarm (I may have missed it.) But I have one as both a boiler can produce it (if the flue gets blocked which is a possibility) and any wood burners can.

The other thing, so an ex of mine used to manage a kitchen design and sales company. Fire rated hinges. So many houses have slow burning doors/fire resistant doors to some extent, but the hinges aren't fire rated and will collapse before the door. She even said a lot of builders will buy the heavier doors (because they legally have too) but they won't the hinges because nobody can easily tell (even a lot of inspectors for HMOs don't check.)

They aren't the cheapest, but are really a life saver IF you get trapped inside.

jansman
Posts: 8348
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by jansman » Tue Jul 28, 2020 4:15 pm

Tankford wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:10 am
Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 8:34 pm
-Snip-
Love your setup, pretty much what I use - I didn't see a carbon monoxide alarm (I may have missed it.) But I have one as both a boiler can produce it (if the flue gets blocked which is a possibility) and any wood burners can.

The other thing, so an ex of mine used to manage a kitchen design and sales company. Fire rated hinges. So many houses have slow burning doors/fire resistant doors to some extent, but the hinges aren't fire rated and will collapse before the door. She even said a lot of builders will buy the heavier doors (because they legally have too) but they won't the hinges because nobody can easily tell (even a lot of inspectors for HMOs don't check.)

They aren't the cheapest, but are really a life saver IF you get trapped inside.
IF you get trapped. A fire plan and escape ladder has always been standard equipment here at chez Jansman.

Like my dad used to say( he was a radar operator/ navigator in HM Royal Navy) “What do you do if you get caught in the leeward side of a storm? Don’t know? “ and then he would bellow, “You don’t get in that position in the first place!”

And where fire safety is concerned, you do it to try not to be in the leeward side of the storm.

On Saturday night, I was locking up and checking the animals, and my neighbours were having a proper party in the garden- and fair enough. They were proper spannered, and had a large suspended umbrella- with a raging fire pit underneath. You know what happened... brolly on fire, falls against dry hedge. Jansman grabs 2 kg powder extinguisher, vaults fence, and shouts “ turn that effiing hose on! It took moments to sort. Said neighbour replaced the extinguisher yesterday. He was rather sheepish, but I was more concerned that he had bought another for himself. He had!

That’s prepping.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 4703
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:15 pm

Tankford wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:10 am
Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 8:34 pm
-Snip-
Love your setup, pretty much what I use - I didn't see a carbon monoxide alarm (I may have missed it.) But I have one as both a boiler can produce it (if the flue gets blocked which is a possibility) and any wood burners can.

The other thing, so an ex of mine used to manage a kitchen design and sales company. Fire rated hinges. So many houses have slow burning doors/fire resistant doors to some extent, but the hinges aren't fire rated and will collapse before the door. She even said a lot of builders will buy the heavier doors (because they legally have too) but they won't the hinges because nobody can easily tell (even a lot of inspectors for HMOs don't check.)

They aren't the cheapest, but are really a life saver IF you get trapped inside.

We've got 3 CO alarms one in the kitchen (boiler) one in the living room (fire place) and another in our bedroom (above kitchen and if windows open chance of combustion gasses from boiler flue been drawn back into house)


All mounted as perscribed in the booklet that they came with


On the subject of hinges it's a rented house I don't plan on been in it a second longer than needed in a fire mainly as the exterior is clad with greenfell style insulation cladding the interior doors are steel butt hinges kitchen door hinges into the living room so on the "protected side of the frame"

Really if your hanging a fire rated door the door casement needs replacing too with one to take the weigh of the door with intermesant (spl) strip rebates and hinge pads and fitted properly with any gaps filled with fire rated foam or sealant before the architraves (spl) like wise the latch and handles should match the ratings of the door and should be chopped in as per the door manufacturers specifics

On 3+ story dwellings door closers should also be fitted from memory
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 4703
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:17 pm

jansman wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 4:15 pm
[

On Saturday night, I was locking up and checking the animals, and my neighbours were having a proper party in the garden- and fair enough. They were proper spannered, and had a large suspended umbrella- with a raging fire pit underneath. You know what happened... brolly on fire, falls against dry hedge. Jansman grabs 2 kg powder extinguisher, vaults fence, and shouts “ turn that effiing hose on! It took moments to sort. Said neighbour replaced the extinguisher yesterday. He was rather sheepish, but I was more concerned that he had bought another for himself. He had!

That’s prepping.
Never rains but it pours in your area..bet the 2kg cloud soon muted the party :lol:

Least they had the decency to replace your extinguisher :o

Bet there was at least one drunk who insisted you had over reacted and got powder in their beer ;)
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

jansman
Posts: 8348
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by jansman » Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:33 pm

Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:17 pm
jansman wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 4:15 pm
[

On Saturday night, I was locking up and checking the animals, and my neighbours were having a proper party in the garden- and fair enough. They were proper spannered, and had a large suspended umbrella- with a raging fire pit underneath. You know what happened... brolly on fire, falls against dry hedge. Jansman grabs 2 kg powder extinguisher, vaults fence, and shouts “ turn that effiing hose on! It took moments to sort. Said neighbour replaced the extinguisher yesterday. He was rather sheepish, but I was more concerned that he had bought another for himself. He had!

That’s prepping.
Never rains but it pours in your area..bet the 2kg cloud soon muted the party :lol:

Least they had the decency to replace your extinguisher :o

Bet there was at least one drunk who insisted you had over reacted and got powder in their beer ;)
Ha ha😀 they are not a bad bunch. Stuff happens here, yes. We live life! The owner of the house is a headmaster at a nearby school- I just left the empty can, and I knew he’d get it! The powder stopped HIS neighbour from fire damage.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.

Tankford
Posts: 34
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2020 10:17 pm

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by Tankford » Tue Jul 28, 2020 7:16 pm

Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:15 pm
Tankford wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:10 am
Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 8:34 pm
-Snip-
-Snip-
Nah I get you and agree with you - my plan is get everyone out and let the water faeries do their job. I just spent a lot of time upgrading the house (ironically I got it cheap as the had been a fire in it).

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 4703
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Tue Jul 28, 2020 10:01 pm

jansman wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 5:33 pm

Ha ha😀 they are not a bad bunch. Stuff happens here, yes. We live life! The owner of the house is a headmaster at a nearby school- I just left the empty can, and I knew he’d get it! The powder stopped HIS neighbour from fire damage.
Thought it was going to be the bathroom torching woman again :lol:

Dry powder is great it's rapid knockdown is good over a large area especially outside if caught early but once heat is built up it's not so good.. gutted the bsi change had had it removed from most areas at work it's quick and does the job (at work I'm not bothered about the mess that's what labourers are for ;-) :lol: :twisted:

(I know you know this that but for the benefit of other members) ;)

As and when I've swapped out most in the house for AB AFFF (foam and abf in the kitchen ) as on soft furnishings the water content soaks into burning textiles / foam rubber cooling the area and preventing reignition once the powder clears and I've gone for chapter 7 (or is it 8) which are safe to 1000v incase of accidentally discharging onto live electrical stuff

I'm not bothered about the powder so much but trying to get the kids out through a blend of smoke and powder doesn't bare thinking about hence my change to foam in the house

Shed has 2x 6kg powder and 2kg of CO2 as they won't freeze / risks in shed include the tumble drier and LPG among others
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 4703
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: home fire safety advice....

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Thu Jul 30, 2020 9:55 pm

Check your domestic appliances regularly look for scorching on sockets and plugs

Check the body of appliances for deformation

This was our chip frier
Screenshot_20200730-220927.png
Bad connection on the switch had caused the casing to melt and bubble :shock:

Never smelt it when in use either bad connection to the switch see how it's got hot and burnt the plating off one terminal
Screenshot_20200730-220940.png
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

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