Hey all

New Members - Introduce yourself, and say a few words
Lubo
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Feb 07, 2020 1:55 am

Hey all

Post by Lubo » Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:53 am

Hey all,

I’m a college student based in Nottingham, after education I plan on moving to Japan which is why I decided to start getting used to prepping, due to how many natural disasters they have there.

Guess you could say I’m prepping to prep :D

Arzosah
Posts: 4394
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: Hey all

Post by Arzosah » Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:58 am

Welcome, Lubo! Thats an interesting choice of location - is that about teaching/ engineering/ ? So for prepping for the move, is that mostly about learning skills? Which would start with the language, I'm thinking.
My blog (all mended now) www.preparednessfactandfiction.co.uk
There are some Amazon affiliate links in this blog

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Deeps
Posts: 5795
Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2014 8:36 pm

Re: Hey all

Post by Deeps » Fri Feb 07, 2020 10:18 am

Welcome to the forum Lubo.

MaxPrep
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2020 9:28 am

Re: Hey all

Post by MaxPrep » Fri Feb 07, 2020 11:30 am

Hi and welcome mate, happy Friday.

Lone
Posts: 111
Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2020 12:30 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Hey all

Post by Lone » Fri Feb 07, 2020 4:27 pm

Japan is fascinating...everything I’ve seen (never been) shows minimalism, things kept for specific meanings, items owned where everything has a specific purpose and so forth, no wastage or too much unnecessaries.

A lot to be learned from there...good place to go for that very reason.

Japanese gardens are amazing...peace and tranquility away from the hectic world...time to reflect.

Though if areas are known to be more prone to disasters than others, choose an ideal location rather than putting yourself at preventable risk.

Lubo
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Feb 07, 2020 1:55 am

Re: Hey all

Post by Lubo » Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:52 pm

Arzosah wrote:
Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:58 am
Welcome, Lubo! Thats an interesting choice of location - is that about teaching/ engineering/ ? So for prepping for the move, is that mostly about learning skills? Which would start with the language, I'm thinking.
So I would like to move there as a translator after university. I already some proficiency in the language and will be studying Japanese at university in September:) mainly focused on getting quality gear for my bug out big which I can use in Japan.

Lubo
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Feb 07, 2020 1:55 am

Re: Hey all

Post by Lubo » Fri Feb 07, 2020 10:01 pm

Lone wrote:
Fri Feb 07, 2020 4:27 pm
Japan is fascinating...everything I’ve seen (never been) shows minimalism, things kept for specific meanings, items owned where everything has a specific purpose and so forth, no wastage or too much unnecessaries.

A lot to be learned from there...good place to go for that very reason.

Japanese gardens are amazing...peace and tranquility away from the hectic world...time to reflect.

Though if areas are known to be more prone to disasters than others, choose an ideal location rather than putting yourself at preventable risk.
It is a fascinating place, I’ve visited 3 times so far and when I eventually move there I don’t plan to return. Unfortunately you can’t really get away from the disasters in Japan, if you live near the costs you run the risk of a tsunami. Live inland there is a possibility you would be affected by one of the 117 active volcanoes erupting or maybe a land slide, live in the north you have insane amounts of snow in the winter. And pretty much the whole of Japan is affected by earthquakes and typhoons, living in Japan I will encounter a major natural disaster, it’s just a matter of time and I need to make sure I’m prepared for it. But I will be avoiding moving to areas close to nuclear power plants, also not living in major cities which could be hit by North Korea.

Lone
Posts: 111
Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2020 12:30 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Hey all

Post by Lone » Fri Feb 07, 2020 10:59 pm

Lubo

Interesting. By any chance have you checked out the prepping already in place in Japan, due to the very fact of being prone to disasters, not just the Government but the people themselves.

There must be shelters of sorts, plus sources where to buy various gear/kits for the public.

Japanese is quite a language to learn...in relation to my own interests, I would have very much liked to have learnt and been fluent in Zulu...shows respect to the country and people you would be visiting/staying at.

Never been to Africa though...it has its own troubles in places too...of different kinds

Lubo
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Feb 07, 2020 1:55 am

Re: Hey all

Post by Lubo » Sat Feb 08, 2020 2:01 am

Lone wrote:
Fri Feb 07, 2020 10:59 pm
Lubo

Interesting. By any chance have you checked out the prepping already in place in Japan, due to the very fact of being prone to disasters, not just the Government but the people themselves.

There must be shelters of sorts, plus sources where to buy various gear/kits for the public.

Japanese is quite a language to learn...in relation to my own interests, I would have very much liked to have learnt and been fluent in Zulu...shows respect to the country and people you would be visiting/staying at.

Never been to Africa though...it has its own troubles in places too...of different kinds
Oh wow learning Zulu would be pretty awesome. And yes Japanese is super hard, I have been learning it for over 3 years in my own time and I’m happy with how far I’ve come but can’t wait to progress more in uni.

So in Japan the government give everyone little books with loads of disaster preparedness information in them, one chapter is evacuation bags. The list is your standard emergency kit, but they include things unique to the disasters they have there ,such as hard hats, and items people tend to overlook like cash, id’s and important documents as your house could be destroyed. They don’t tend to have much bush craft stuff, which makes sense as they will usually be evacuating a city to move to a shelter. I’m going to include some bushcraft stuff in my bag as you never know how it could come in handy, maybe I’ll need a knife to help cut someone’s seatbelt who’s stuck in a car or something, you never know. Also I love going camping so it will get use anyway :D

The book also has lots of information on how to bug in, in Japanese supermarkets you can get lots of long life food meant for survival. Like a tin of biscuits or a tin can of bread, also water in bottles which lasts 5 years.

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PreppingPingu
Posts: 758
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 5:10 pm
Location: Surrey/Hampshire

Re: Hey all

Post by PreppingPingu » Sun Feb 09, 2020 11:38 am

Welcome, hope you find some useful info here on the forums. There is a section on bug out bags and every day carry bags that may help focus your thoughts on what you are looking for.
"Today is the tomorrow that you worrried about yesterday" - unknown
"Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast" - Red Dwarf
(Area 3)

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