The most unusual thing used as food

Food, Nutrition and Agriculture
jansman
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by jansman » Mon Aug 12, 2019 7:58 pm

I remember reading about the Siege of Sarajevo in the 90's.A soup of foraged leaves would be made on the balcony of an apartment,cooked on what we know,as a Hobo Stove.Sometime that was it,but sometimes there was rice from a Red Cross parcel,to thicken it up.

Pound for pound,I consider rice to be the most easily stored survival food there is.A kilogram goes a long way.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

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Deeps
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by Deeps » Mon Aug 12, 2019 9:06 pm

jansman wrote:
Mon Aug 12, 2019 7:58 pm
I remember reading about the Siege of Sarajevo in the 90's.A soup of foraged leaves would be made on the balcony of an apartment,cooked on what we know,as a Hobo Stove.Sometime that was it,but sometimes there was rice from a Red Cross parcel,to thicken it up.

Pound for pound,I consider rice to be the most easily stored survival food there is.A kilogram goes a long way.
As we've both said in the past, rice keeps a lot of the planet going. Its not my fave carb but a small amount goes a long way and its not expensive.

grenfell
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by grenfell » Tue Aug 13, 2019 1:31 pm

Thinking about it this could be very easily sub divided into famine type foods for when desperation kicks in which in all likelyhood we aren't going to see a famine in this country any time soon and "unusual " or less commonly eaten foods that could be a way to eek out a low income. For example offal is something a lot of people don't eat as a general rule but can be gotten often quite cheaply. The nettles mentioned seem to put some people off too but make decent eating and are abundant.i know jansman has mentioned rabbits and again that could easily fall i to the latter category . It used to be quite common at one time and as a kid i can clearly remember them hanging in the butcher's window but if my own family is anything to go by even mention of it results in turned up noses.

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jeffleft
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by jeffleft » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:43 pm

Cheers jansman, another great reason to become a feeder :lol:

But seriously dont wild Rabits have myxomatosis?
The world garnered your chance existence, the most you can expect is your next breath and the most you can truly want is a peaceful passing

jansman
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by jansman » Tue Aug 13, 2019 6:18 pm

I breed meat rabbits,so no myxamatosis. They are fox- proofed, so no myxi fleas can get near. I also shoot and ferret wild rabbits.Myxamatosis rears its head occasionally,usually when warm and wet ( a bit like blight on plants).However, myxied rabbits are still edible.Myxamatosis is only a problem if you are a rabbit! If I was that hungry it would not bother me to eat one.I am also fond of pigeon,and there are plenty of those.And rooks.And squirrels.And loads of freshwater fish - I can catch those easily; an average session on the river near me can yield 20lb.If I was after pike,they are very readily caught ( when you know the local methods).Chuck in the foraging potential and garden,then food of some sort is available.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

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jeffleft
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by jeffleft » Tue Aug 13, 2019 7:29 pm

Cheers jansman. I'm no big fan of Rabit, its still usefull to know.

Rabit always me of greasy Chicken that smells like a stray Cat and no I have never knowingly eaten Cat! I say knowingly, because I have eaten at some qustionable outlets :?

You mention pigeon what about Seagulls? those things are everywhere!

I'm sure I read myxamatosis was introduced on purpose by the French? and while we are talking about the french anyone ever tried snails? I have been told two diferent things, they have no flavour or they taste like onions?
The world garnered your chance existence, the most you can expect is your next breath and the most you can truly want is a peaceful passing

Nurseandy
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by Nurseandy » Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:08 pm

We used to shoot the wild rabbits out the back and eat them. My daughters are early teens now and I'm not "allowed" to. Ffs. :-(

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