Advice for a hopeless gardener

Food, Nutrition and Agriculture
ForgeCorvus
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Re: Advice for a hopeless gardener

Post by ForgeCorvus » Sun Jul 18, 2021 4:33 pm

Growing 'stuff' is never cost effective, a farm or market garden is a much more efficient (and therefore cheaper by the unit) way of making food........ However, you can't learn the skills except by doing. Its a 'teach a man to fish' kinda-thing.

Also you know whats gone on and in your food and you can get a lot of satisfaction from the fact that you've cut your food-miles to food-feet.

I'm just dipping my toe in ATM and I quite like it
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jansman
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Re: Advice for a hopeless gardener

Post by jansman » Sun Jul 18, 2021 5:23 pm

ForgeCorvus wrote:
Sun Jul 18, 2021 4:33 pm
Growing 'stuff' is never cost effective, a farm or market garden is a much more efficient (and therefore cheaper by the unit) way of making food........ However, you can't learn the skills except by doing. Its a 'teach a man to fish' kinda-thing.

Also you know whats gone on and in your food and you can get a lot of satisfaction from the fact that you've cut your food-miles to food-feet.

I'm just dipping my toe in ATM and I quite like it
I would encourage anyone who has a go at growing food. It is a wonderful skill,and a wonderful hobby. If nothing else,it makes you aware of weather,and the seasons.Like a farmer does; except ,you are a backyard farmer. You WILL have failures - local to me it is tomatoes that aren’t so good,talking to the local gardening mafia! :lol: Initially it costs,but keep going,learn and grow and eat.If the day ever comes that you NEED to grow food,then you are ahead of the pack. Soon, you will learn to save seeds,save work, and money.
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jennyjj01
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Re: Advice for a hopeless gardener

Post by jennyjj01 » Sun Jul 18, 2021 8:48 pm

jansman wrote:
Sun Jul 18, 2021 5:23 pm
ForgeCorvus wrote:
Sun Jul 18, 2021 4:33 pm
Growing 'stuff' is never cost effective,...

I'm just dipping my toe in ATM and I quite like it
I would encourage anyone who has a go at growing food. It is a wonderful skill,and a wonderful hobby.
Ok. Better late than never. One planter fully built and installed.
Amazon Prime has done it's magic in getting some swiss chard, Beetroot and spring onion seeds delivered today. Rocket tomorrow.

I discovered that seeds come at all sorts of prices and quantities. It seems that the cost of the seeds is tiny compared to the postage and packing. So a pack of seeds might have contents of 100 or 3,000 of the same seeds at similar price. Only the package seems to vary: Either a nice, nearly empty, retail envelope or a small, fully loaded, barely labelled mylar bag ..... So I now have lots to stash. Even I can't kill 1,500 beetroot (£1.49), can I? :shock:

8 bags of topsoil from Wickes at 10p / litre and 4 bags of compost from the local garden centre, which was giving away pallets, towards the next planter. I love free stuff. ;) ;)

Baby steps, but sowing tomorrow
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jansman
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Re: Advice for a hopeless gardener

Post by jansman » Mon Jul 19, 2021 6:34 am

jennyjj01 wrote:
Sun Jul 18, 2021 8:48 pm
jansman wrote:
Sun Jul 18, 2021 5:23 pm
ForgeCorvus wrote:
Sun Jul 18, 2021 4:33 pm
Growing 'stuff' is never cost effective,...

I'm just dipping my toe in ATM and I quite like it
I would encourage anyone who has a go at growing food. It is a wonderful skill,and a wonderful hobby.
Ok. Better late than never. One planter fully built and installed.
Amazon Prime has done it's magic in getting some swiss chard, Beetroot and spring onion seeds delivered today. Rocket tomorrow.

I discovered that seeds come at all sorts of prices and quantities. It seems that the cost of the seeds is tiny compared to the postage and packing. So a pack of seeds might have contents of 100 or 3,000 of the same seeds at similar price. Only the package seems to vary: Either a nice, nearly empty, retail envelope or a small, fully loaded, barely labelled mylar bag ..... So I now have lots to stash. Even I can't kill 1,500 beetroot (£1.49), can I? :shock:

8 bags of topsoil from Wickes at 10p / litre and 4 bags of compost from the local garden centre, which was giving away pallets, towards the next planter. I love free stuff. ;) ;)

Baby steps, but sowing tomorrow
Do your sowing early or late,given the current heat. SOAK,and I mean SOAK your soil. Give it an hour to ‘ settle’ at least. You can sow your seed then,and all you have to do is keep them damp,not sluice them with water.

Stored seeds: like any foodstuffs,keep them dark/ cool. I use an old biscuit tin on the thrall at the back of our pantry.

Buying seed: many here use Real Seeds,I have,and still grow a couple of pea varieties from them. However,I am tight-fisted.I use : https://www.premierseedsdirect.com/ and latterly,a new kid on the block: https://bargainseeds.co.uk/

The beauty of bargainseeds is that they supply small quantities of seeds at corresponding prices. As much as I like beetroot and carrots,3000 seeds of each won’t be sown before they become unviable. And they do deteriorate overtime.There are many preppers who don’t actually do any gardening,but still buy ‘heirloom seeds in case SHTF’,as if the shops will shut and they will sow their survival seed stash into a piece of ground,then Hey Presto! They expect a week later,the contents of the fruit and veg isle at Tesco. :lol:

So what you are doing,learning about gardening failure, before you may need it ,is a very good move. You will have success,but you most certainly have fails. That’s gardening.Enjoy your project today. :D
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.

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jennyjj01
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Re: Advice for a hopeless gardener

Post by jennyjj01 » Mon Jul 19, 2021 8:37 am

jansman wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 6:34 am
Do your sowing early or late,given the current heat. SOAK,and I mean SOAK your soil. Give it an hour to ‘ settle’ at least. You can sow your seed then,and all you have to do is keep them damp,not sluice them with water.
...
https://www.premierseedsdirect.com/ and latterly,a new kid on the block: https://bargainseeds.co.uk/
Thanks again. Indeed my amazon order turned out to be premierseedsdirect. Prices are slightly different between web site and amazon store, mostly to reflect postage. But with amazon prime, they seem unbeatable. Next time, I'll go direct and think ahead a bit more and save a £1 :)
jansman wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 6:34 am
As much as I like beetroot and carrots,3000 seeds of each won’t be sown before they become unviable.
Seems I ONLY ordered 1,500 :) for £1.49 ( or 99p direct), it was a no-brainer.
jansman wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 6:34 am
There are many preppers who don’t actually do any gardening,but still buy ‘heirloom seeds in case SHTF’,as if the shops will shut and they will sow their survival seed stash into a piece of ground,then Hey Presto! They expect a week later,the contents of the fruit and veg isle at Tesco. :lol:
I'm counting on my first crop in 3 months :)
Yes. I was one of them. I realise that post apocalypse there are going to be some very disappointed preppers with their stash of seeds wondering when they will be allocated an allotment and then wondering how to get it fruitful before all the dried mash is all gone. Let alone defending their crops from snails and critters and thieves.
jansman wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 6:34 am
So what you are doing,learning about gardening failure, before you may need it ,is a very good move. You will have success,but you most certainly have fails. That’s gardening.Enjoy your project today. :D
Baby steps :)
Graceful Degradation! Prepping's objective summed up in two words. Turning Disaster into Mild Inconvenience by the power of fore-thought

Free hug vouchers. Please take one and copy and redistribute as often as you like.
Redeemable on demand.

jansman
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Re: Advice for a hopeless gardener

Post by jansman » Mon Jul 19, 2021 11:39 am

The cabbage white butterflies are doing the usual; laying eggs so the caterpillars can decimate my brassicas!

If it ain’t weather, it’s pests. Good job we won’t starve without that crop.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.

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