Children's knives

Kit, Clothing, Tools, etc
Arzosah
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Children's knives

Post by Arzosah » Sun Feb 07, 2021 3:09 pm

I know, what a heading! But bear with me, I'm reccing a Montessori article https://www.howwemontessori.com/how-we- ... nives.html

I love the idea of letting a young child use a crinkle cut chipper, or a butter knife - I have a high quality butter knife made of wood, which would be fine for spreading jam, or peanut butter. Completely blunt in terms of being a "knife", but definitely a knife shape, and very sturdy.

jansman
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Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: Children's knives

Post by jansman » Sun Feb 07, 2021 4:10 pm

I didn’t know such things existed! That is excellent. Children should learn how to use a knife,after all ,knives are the most ancient tool known to us.We now have a cultural fear of knives,and it shouldn’t be so.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.

ForgeCorvus
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Joined: Fri Feb 08, 2013 11:32 pm

Re: Children's knives

Post by ForgeCorvus » Sun Feb 07, 2021 5:24 pm

I never knew that anyone made cooking knives for kids.
I thought you were talking about something like the kid-safe Opinels
Image


Knives have been demonised by the press etc for so long that carrying almost any kind of bladed tool instantly makes you a bad person.
The twin teenagers in my dance team were horrified when they first found out that I had a pocket knife and that I carried one everyday (even when going to practices or to the pub). The phrase "But, you're a nice person..... Why would you do that?" was used.
jennyjj01 wrote:"I'm not in the least bit worried because I'm prepared: Are you?"
Londonpreppy wrote: At its core all prepping is, is making sure you're not down to your last sheet of loo roll when you really need a poo.
"All Things Strive" Gd Tak 'Gar

Arzosah
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Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: Children's knives

Post by Arzosah » Sun Feb 07, 2021 7:59 pm

It's interesting, isn't it! The history is important too - all those flint knives, made either from one piece or lots of tiny pieces set into antler or some such, that they find at archaeological digs. And incidentally, ForgeCorvus, Opinels are mentioned in the article. The research that's gone into it is amazing.

ForgeCorvus
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Re: Children's knives

Post by ForgeCorvus » Sun Feb 07, 2021 9:07 pm

Yep, I saw the Opinel. I knew they made 'grown-up' kitchen knives, but I didn't know they did a kids version.

I've been known to refer to knives as "Tool #1"
jennyjj01 wrote:"I'm not in the least bit worried because I'm prepared: Are you?"
Londonpreppy wrote: At its core all prepping is, is making sure you're not down to your last sheet of loo roll when you really need a poo.
"All Things Strive" Gd Tak 'Gar

Yorkshire Andy
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Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: Children's knives

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Sun Feb 07, 2021 9:24 pm

Mora do a good "safety" knife in a few forms one carries the scout logo on the scabbard


https://prepareforadventure.co.uk/produ ... B8EALw_wcB
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

jansman
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Re: Children's knives

Post by jansman » Mon Feb 08, 2021 5:02 am

Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Sun Feb 07, 2021 9:24 pm
Mora do a good "safety" knife in a few forms one carries the scout logo on the scabbard


https://prepareforadventure.co.uk/produ ... B8EALw_wcB
My uncle gave me my first penknife when I was six. Do you remember those ‘jack knives’ that the newsagents sold on a card? One of those.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.

User avatar
pseudonym
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Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 10:11 am
Location: East Midlands

Re: Children's knives

Post by pseudonym » Mon Feb 08, 2021 9:40 am

Please be aware of the UK Knife laws regarding fixed blade length. It doesn't matter the age of the carrier.

I know cub scout troops who have all their Moras locked in an Ammo box when not in use. Talk about not trusting your members. :roll:

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Le Mouse
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Location: Area 4

Re: Children's knives

Post by Le Mouse » Mon Feb 08, 2021 10:15 am

ForgeCorvus wrote:
Sun Feb 07, 2021 5:24 pm
Knives have been demonised by the press etc for so long that carrying almost any kind of bladed tool instantly makes you a bad person.
The twin teenagers in my dance team were horrified when they first found out that I had a pocket knife and that I carried one everyday (even when going to practices or to the pub). The phrase "But, you're a nice person..... Why would you do that?" was used.
I've had some odd responses to having a pocket knife. I was using my *very small and pretty much blunt* crappy penknife to open some boxes at work once and my manager's eyes came out on stalks. She didn't stop me or anything, but mumbled something about hoping security wasn't planning on doing a building check. The students who we had in to help with the project steered well clear of me :lol:

And then you have my brother, a police sergeant, asking his 'prepper sister' if he could borrow her (perfectly legal) swiss army knife so he can break into all the plastic cr@p they wrap kids toys in nowadays. His daughters are being brought up with the knowledge that all tools, used properly, are safe.

izzy_mack
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Re: Children's knives

Post by izzy_mack » Mon Feb 08, 2021 1:28 pm

I do find myself despairing of the newest generation, not that it's their fault but ours for accepting the cotton wool mentality. When one of my sons was 7 or 8 he announced that he was taking over the chicken incubator and brooder, which he did with good effect. When he was 11 he said this is silly, I should do it all and asked to be taught to kill, pluck and gut the cockerels which we ate. When he was 12 he asked for a knife of his own but by this time it was getting dodgy to have a knife and I said not yet. Well I came home from shopping to find he had made one from scrap metal and a bit of deer antler, it was blooming good! I was really proud of him, he still has it and it is still useful! Reckon if this all happened today we'd end up being refered to social services!

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