The most unusual thing used as food

Food, Nutrition and Agriculture
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jeffleft
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The most unusual thing used as food

Post by jeffleft » Sun Aug 11, 2019 8:12 pm

Arzosah was questioning the safety of eating apples from a cemetery and apart from reminding me to question, does black spot transfered from roses effect pears enough to stop me making pear cider?

Arzosah got me thinking what can be used for food?

Apart from my cousin from Australia who would crunch down chicken bones and a few friends with plans to eat grass rather than remain in the eu! :roll:

What can a preppers body stomach?
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Yorkshire Andy
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Sun Aug 11, 2019 9:47 pm

Hmmm chicken bones . Buy a pressure cooker add what ever is left of the carcass add few bits and bobs you have 4l of chicken soup / broth / stock to scoff
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

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grenfell
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by grenfell » Mon Aug 12, 2019 7:17 am

On another forum a question was asked what use grass is . Obvious!y animals can eat it but it was suggested that it can be made into leafcurd for human consumption. It's not something i've looked at in any greater detail than a quick google and i'm not totally convinced but it's a thought.

Arzosah
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by Arzosah » Mon Aug 12, 2019 8:46 am

Didn't people eat grass during the wars as Yugoslavia fell apart? And (as per The Death Of Grass :oops: ) aren't rice and wheat grass? Sorry!
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grenfell
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by grenfell » Mon Aug 12, 2019 9:47 am

Having a google brings up this ,
https://www.quora.com/Can-we-eat-grass
Seems it's at least possible although we aren't really evolved to extract nutrition from it .
Yes i believe wheat and rice are grasses along with barley and rye (and possibly oats ?) although it's really the seed of those grasses we eat rather than the actual leaves.

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jeffleft
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by jeffleft » Mon Aug 12, 2019 10:42 am

Didnt the dutch eat Tulip bulbs during WW2?
The world garnered your chance existence, the most you can expect is your next breath and the most you can truly want is a peaceful passing

grenfell
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by grenfell » Mon Aug 12, 2019 5:22 pm

Out of necessity they did ,
https://www.fluwel.com/eating-tulip-bulbs
I seem to recall someone during that same war suggesting that people should eat rhubarb leaves , this time here rather than in holland although unfortunately i can't find a link . Thankfully that "advice"was soon dropped ,,too much oxalic acid to make them edible.

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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by jansman » Mon Aug 12, 2019 5:56 pm

In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

grenfell
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by grenfell » Mon Aug 12, 2019 6:20 pm

Thankfully we're a little way off from that last one .

Arzosah
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Re: The most unusual thing used as food

Post by Arzosah » Mon Aug 12, 2019 7:25 pm

With the first two, though, there are some comparatively ordinary plants listed as "famine" foods: nettle, dulse, mustard, watercress, sorrel, beetroot, sweet potato ... it also lists orache, which I saw being grown for the cafe in the kitchen garden at Ham House (National Trust in London) last Tuesday :) Mind you, I won't be eating silkworms or scorpions any time soon, they *do* count as famine food :o
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