Dehydration in Uganda

Food, Nutrition and Agriculture
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FlashPan
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Dehydration in Uganda

Post by FlashPan » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:07 pm

Just though to share this:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44579530

I was mainly shocked at the amount of food wasteage and cheapness of this unit.

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Arzosah
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Re: Dehydration in Uganda

Post by Arzosah » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:19 pm

Such a simple thing! I wonder if the price is very high in Ugandan terms, though. And we've never heard anything about that level of waste ... I'm really surprised they don't have their own version of pickling and salting ...
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Deeps
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Re: Dehydration in Uganda

Post by Deeps » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:21 pm

A bit bigger and a bit more agricultural than mine but I'd have one of those bad boys.

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FlashPan
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Re: Dehydration in Uganda

Post by FlashPan » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:27 pm

$80 I think in Uganda is quite high considering an accountant earns under $10k per year

https://www.averagesalarysurvey.com/uganda

Hopefully this is not a bad thing to think or say but maybe the amount of wasteage can be linked to the starvation levels in this continent? There is no or not enough infrastructure to look after and store what is locally made.
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jansman
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Re: Dehydration in Uganda

Post by jansman » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:56 am

Very little electricity,so no refrigeration.A common problem in Africa.It is for that reason,and batteries being scarce and expensive,that the wind-up radio came,about.The diet in Nigeria is obviously plant based so has a short shelf life.Hence food waste.
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grenfell
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Re: Dehydration in Uganda

Post by grenfell » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:12 am

Excellent idea given the levels of wastage but it's a pity there's not any more detaiil in that report. It mentions using garden waste and gas to dehydrate the food so I would assume that there is some form of biodigester producing methane in the process.

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peejay
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Re: Dehydration in Uganda

Post by peejay » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:34 am

I'm no expert but I can't help thinking that 10kg of mangos in 2hrs sounds more like an oven than a dehydrator? Wouldn't they normally take at least 24hrs with a domestic dehydrator?

jansman
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Re: Dehydration in Uganda

Post by jansman » Fri Aug 17, 2018 6:13 pm

peejay wrote:
Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:34 am
I'm no expert but I can't help thinking that 10kg of mangos in 2hrs sounds more like an oven than a dehydrator? Wouldn't they normally take at least 24hrs with a domestic dehydrator?
They would. The Nigerian model is industrial,and developing world.We play about on a ' hobby' level.Any criticism of their food waste by the First World is a bit rich,as I guess that the Nigerian farmers don't like it either.Mind you,an earlier post did question whether they had local preservation methods.That would be interesting to research...
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jansman
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Re: Dehydration in Uganda

Post by jansman » Fri Aug 17, 2018 6:26 pm

Cannot find info on preservation.However...http://www.travelstart.com.ng/blog/22-f ... ng-abroad/
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

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Deeps
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Re: Dehydration in Uganda

Post by Deeps » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:06 pm

jansman wrote:
Fri Aug 17, 2018 6:13 pm
They would. The Nigerian model is industrial,and developing world.We play about on a ' hobby' level.Any criticism of their food waste by the First World is a bit rich,as I guess that the Nigerian farmers don't like it either.Mind you,an earlier post did question whether they had local preservation methods.That would be interesting to research...
Totally. While I'm not sure if the article was scoring points, I bet the Nigerian's would win the competition of who wastes the least. We're pretty good at it in the First World. I'm guessing 'it is what it is', as you say I bet they don't want to waste stuff that they could sell for a profit.

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