Perennial Vegetables

Food, Nutrition and Agriculture
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Re: Perennial Vegetables

Postby jansman » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:30 pm

We have hedge garlic too.Useful stuff in salads.Ragwort always get rooted out.Its the country boy in me. The Egyptian onions showed up today.Looking forward to establishing those.One thing we have ' 'Perennialised' is Nasturtium. Really useful.
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Re: Perennial Vegetables

Postby Britcit » Mon Aug 07, 2017 2:51 am

Reading this thread had me googling for ages, as I hadn't heard of most of the plants you were all talking about. I am a keen gardener, but a pretty basic one. Spuds, onions, swede, cabbage etc.

My only thoughts towards perennial veg were putting in an asparagus bed. (Since moving 2 years ago, have had to start over).

Y'all got me thinking, and now I'm gonna give the Egyptian onions a whirl (bulbs on order). Maybe the Jerusalem artichoke as well.
"There are none so blind as those who will not see. The most deluded people are those who choose to ignore what they already know."

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Re: Perennial Vegetables

Postby grenfell » Mon Aug 07, 2017 7:22 am

Did you put the asparagus in? I'm not really a fan of it , just seems like glorified cabbage stalks to me , but the rest of the family seem to like it. I think what has held me back giving it a go are the yields which don't seem to be very high for the space it takes up and the couple of years for it to get established before anything can be harvested.

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Re: Perennial Vegetables

Postby Britcit » Mon Aug 07, 2017 10:22 am

grenfell wrote:Did you put the asparagus in? I'm not really a fan of it , just seems like glorified cabbage stalks to me , but the rest of the family seem to like it. I think what has held me back giving it a go are the yields which don't seem to be very high for the space it takes up and the couple of years for it to get established before anything can be harvested.


I did put some in at the old house, but we moved before it started to yield a crop. Like you say, a proper crop dosnt really begin until the third year. The new residents got rid of it just as it beginning to crop :x
I will be putting some in here in our new garden. It is a longer term veg yes, and does take up quite some space but we do have plenty of of room and we both love it.
I plan on putting in different types that crop at different times of year.
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Re: Perennial Vegetables

Postby junmist » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:16 pm

Arzosah wrote:Brilliant stuff! One weed that I've let grow is a clump of ragwort - no horses will ever use my back garden, after all, and there's a moth or a butterfly round here that only eats ragwort - I figure I should do my bit for the local ecology. Comfrey, buddleia, and a scabious I'm nursing are also popular, and a yellow thing thats probably a sedum but I don't know which - the hover flies lurve it.

When I did my Real Seeds order at the start of the year, I also bought some bread poppy seeds - apparently the poppy heads don't have the usual holes, so they don't fall out - you can plant some, of course, but they're a lot easier to gather for use in cookery (all psychoactive substances removed :mrgreen: ).


Hate to say this Arzosah but it is illegal to let ragwort flower and reseed the caterpillars of the moth will still eat it, just cut the head of before it flower's and don't worry about the moth, the blasted plant is not endangered ask any horse owner. :lol:
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Re: Perennial Vegetables

Postby junmist » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:21 pm

Does anyone have an olive tree that gives them olive's or is this not viable in the uk. I was just wondering if this would be a good buy as I would love to try to make my own oil.
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Re: Perennial Vegetables

Postby grenfell » Sun Aug 13, 2017 8:23 am

I've not got one myself but seem to recall there being some at a place I worked at years ago . They were grown in an orangery along with surprisingly oranges and lemons. Unfortunately I didn't ask or really go nosing around so can't say how well they crop.

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Re: Perennial Vegetables

Postby Arzosah » Sun Aug 13, 2017 8:32 am

junmist wrote:
Arzosah wrote:Brilliant stuff! One weed that I've let grow is a clump of ragwort - no horses will ever use my back garden, after all, and there's a moth or a butterfly round here that only eats ragwort - I figure I should do my bit for the local ecology. Comfrey, buddleia, and a scabious I'm nursing are also popular, and a yellow thing thats probably a sedum but I don't know which - the hover flies lurve it.


Hate to say this Arzosah but it is illegal to let ragwort flower and reseed the caterpillars of the moth will still eat it, just cut the head of before it flower's and don't worry about the moth, the blasted plant is not endangered ask any horse owner. :lol:

From my research, it really doesn't seem to be illegal:

https://www.foe.co.uk/blog/ragwort-pois ... mythbuster

https://www.rhs.org.uk/Advice/profile?PID=299

http://www.ragwortfacts.com/ragwort-law-myths.html

The RHS page has a link that leads to a pdf on the Control of Ragwort, published by DEFRA.


And the endangerment I was referring to was about the moth, not ragwort itself. HTH.

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Re: Perennial Vegetables

Postby jansman » Mon Aug 28, 2017 12:34 pm

The Egyptian Onions are now well established. Along with chives, garlic chives and Welsh onions, that's the Alliums taken care of. Little by little the garden is becoming perennial.
'Yesterday is history,tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift.'
Josephine Burgess.

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