What a day!

Medical and Healthcare
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Medusa
Posts: 120
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2016 8:41 pm
Location: UK

Re: What a day!

Post by Medusa » Wed Sep 19, 2018 10:26 pm

Wow, she is indeed very lucky that you were there. I hope that you took some time this evening to practice self care after an extremely traumatic event. I also hope that some review training is provided in the correct use of equipment for all employees and that everyone is encouraged to update their First Aid training.
Growing old disgracefully!

jansman
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Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: What a day!

Post by jansman » Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:58 am

Arzosah wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:46 pm
Jansman! You hero! Bleepingitis, a lot happens round your way, seriously! You did amazingly well to cope with all that, she was very lucky you were there.

How have you been this evening after all that?
Just fine. “Stuff Happens” as my wife always says. Medusa, there is to be a review today- knife training to be conducted by myself and another senior butcher.

I spent an hour repacking my personal car FAK, reloading my pockets. Ready for the next event!
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

richardivryn
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Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2013 6:25 pm
Location: area 12, Sawnsea.

Re: What a day!

Post by richardivryn » Thu Sep 20, 2018 1:35 pm

The last serious accident where I work the first aider ran away after seeing the blood (with the first aid kit) and one of the female line operators used a sanitary pad as a dressing, paramedics commended her quick thinking.
Area 12

Tizzie
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Joined: Thu Aug 28, 2014 12:54 pm

Re: What a day!

Post by Tizzie » Thu Sep 20, 2018 2:19 pm

Oh my word, oh my word!! Well done.

Yorkshire Andy
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Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: What a day!

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:47 pm

richardivryn wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 1:35 pm
The last serious accident where I work the first aider ran away after seeing the blood (with the first aid kit) and one of the female line operators used a sanitary pad as a dressing, paramedics commended her quick thinking.

Our training provider on day 1 of the 3 day fa@work course got a ring binder of nasties out (decent gorey images) 2 " went green " and he sent them packing telling them he would refund the course fees or offer another place to another staff member from their firm as they are no good if they can't deal with seeing a mess let alone deal with the smell of blood thinking butchers shop on a hot day or crap and piss if someone's in a bad way.. one run out gipping....
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

jansman
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Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: What a day!

Post by jansman » Thu Sep 20, 2018 6:03 pm

Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:47 pm
richardivryn wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 1:35 pm
The last serious accident where I work the first aider ran away after seeing the blood (with the first aid kit) and one of the female line operators used a sanitary pad as a dressing, paramedics commended her quick thinking.

Our training provider on day 1 of the 3 day fa@work course got a ring binder of nasties out (decent gorey images) 2 " went green " and he sent them packing telling them he would refund the course fees or offer another place to another staff member from their firm as they are no good if they can't deal with seeing a mess let alone deal with the smell of blood thinking butchers shop on a hot day or crap and piss if someone's in a bad way.. one run out gipping....
Its a good point Andy.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

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Deeps
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Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2014 8:36 pm

Re: What a day!

Post by Deeps » Thu Sep 20, 2018 6:25 pm

Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:47 pm
richardivryn wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 1:35 pm
The last serious accident where I work the first aider ran away after seeing the blood (with the first aid kit) and one of the female line operators used a sanitary pad as a dressing, paramedics commended her quick thinking.

Our training provider on day 1 of the 3 day fa@work course got a ring binder of nasties out (decent gorey images) 2 " went green " and he sent them packing telling them he would refund the course fees or offer another place to another staff member from their firm as they are no good if they can't deal with seeing a mess let alone deal with the smell of blood thinking butchers shop on a hot day or crap and piss if someone's in a bad way.. one run out gipping....
I totally get where you're coming from but some will be doing a First Aid course for more mundane things like paper cuts and putting someone in a recovery position. If you work in an environment like Jansman then blood could well be an issue but if you work in an office in a town (like a hell of a lot of people) then its a different level of first aid. I've done a few over the years where people have the make up of blood etc but that was a military environment and was still only classed as a level 2 course, a bit OTT for a lot of situations.

Yorkshire Andy
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Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: What a day!

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Thu Sep 20, 2018 7:22 pm

Deeps wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 6:25 pm
Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:47 pm
richardivryn wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 1:35 pm
The last serious accident where I work the first aider ran away after seeing the blood (with the first aid kit) and one of the female line operators used a sanitary pad as a dressing, paramedics commended her quick thinking.

Our training provider on day 1 of the 3 day fa@work course got a ring binder of nasties out (decent gorey images) 2 " went green " and he sent them packing telling them he would refund the course fees or offer another place to another staff member from their firm as they are no good if they can't deal with seeing a mess let alone deal with the smell of blood thinking butchers shop on a hot day or crap and piss if someone's in a bad way.. one run out gipping....
I totally get where you're coming from but some will be doing a First Aid course for more mundane things like paper cuts and putting someone in a recovery position. If you work in an environment like Jansman then blood could well be an issue but if you work in an office in a town (like a hell of a lot of people) then its a different level of first aid. I've done a few over the years where people have the make up of blood etc but that was a military environment and was still only classed as a level 2 course, a bit OTT for a lot of situations.
It is a aqa qualification course the one I did which he explained you have to demonstrate proficiency in both practical and written tests . He went on to explain even a office environment a first aider had the possibility of dealing with things like amputated fingers in doors, someone been run over in the works car park upto assaults / falls down stairs etc

The latest guide lines brought in catastrophic bleeding probably due to the increased terror threat.. which was only usually taught as a +F (Forrester / arborist) extension covering serious / catastrophic bleeds )
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

Bijela
Posts: 41
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2018 6:20 pm

Re: What a day!

Post by Bijela » Thu Sep 20, 2018 7:35 pm

I work in a large supermarket. We get everything cuts and the odd oven burn is common. Not had a heart attack yet, but other have.

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Deeps
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Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2014 8:36 pm

Re: What a day!

Post by Deeps » Fri Sep 21, 2018 12:10 am

Yorkshire Andy wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 7:22 pm

It is a aqa qualification course the one I did which he explained you have to demonstrate proficiency in both practical and written tests . He went on to explain even a office environment a first aider had the possibility of dealing with things like amputated fingers in doors, someone been run over in the works car park upto assaults / falls down stairs etc

The latest guide lines brought in catastrophic bleeding probably due to the increased terror threat.. which was only usually taught as a +F (Forrester / arborist) extension covering serious / catastrophic bleeds )
Like I say, not all First Aider's work in the same environment, they might be happy to have it on their CV but there are different levels of First Aid. Its still First Aid.

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