Flat power protection

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xplosiv1
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Location: Scotland

Re: Flat power protection

Post by xplosiv1 » Sun Feb 11, 2018 2:54 pm

Yorkshire Andy wrote:However iirc its illegal to store gas in a high rise / flat / against terms of tennency agreement

Especially since greenfell

That and with no balcony you would need s flue to vent the combustion gases

I was thinking more mains gas supply not bottles, when my power goes out I still have a gas supply to my oven and hob however the fridge / freezer would need to have a continuously burning pilot light not one of the new electronic ignition systems unless a battery was available.

the majority of gas fridges these days work off main electricity, LPG gas and 12V batteries as they are designed for caravans and boats depending on where it was placed in the flat a flexible flue could be routed to a window when gas is required for operation and a battery for the ignition system.

another option for long term cooling might be a solar powered cool box, small but big enough for the essentials, if the power is out for any length of time most people run through the contents of the fridge first, cook any fresh meat etc. if the power was out for weeks on end the shops wont be stocking fresh food that needs refrigeration anyway if they're even open.

A small cool box or freezer with a small solar panel that would fit in your window might be a way forward..... from a quick look about the internet I came across the one on the link below, it only requires 80W which is one small solar panel that could fit in a window.

http://www.bimblesolar.com/offgrid/sola ... idge-PF166
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Deeps
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Re: Flat power protection

Post by Deeps » Sun Feb 11, 2018 3:41 pm

xplosiv1 wrote:
Yorkshire Andy wrote:However iirc its illegal to store gas in a high rise / flat / against terms of tennency agreement

Especially since greenfell

That and with no balcony you would need s flue to vent the combustion gases

I was thinking more mains gas supply not bottles, when my power goes out I still have a gas supply to my oven and hob however the fridge / freezer would need to have a continuously burning pilot light not one of the new electronic ignition systems unless a battery was available.

the majority of gas fridges these days work off main electricity, LPG gas and 12V batteries as they are designed for caravans and boats depending on where it was placed in the flat a flexible flue could be routed to a window when gas is required for operation and a battery for the ignition system.

another option for long term cooling might be a solar powered cool box, small but big enough for the essentials, if the power is out for any length of time most people run through the contents of the fridge first, cook any fresh meat etc. if the power was out for weeks on end the shops wont be stocking fresh food that needs refrigeration anyway if they're even open.

A small cool box or freezer with a small solar panel that would fit in your window might be a way forward..... from a quick look about the internet I came across the one on the link below, it only requires 80W which is one small solar panel that could fit in a window.

http://www.bimblesolar.com/offgrid/sola ... idge-PF166
It costs nearly a grand though. :shock:

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xplosiv1
Posts: 417
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 2:12 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Flat power protection

Post by xplosiv1 » Sun Feb 11, 2018 3:58 pm

Deeps wrote:
xplosiv1 wrote:
Yorkshire Andy wrote:However iirc its illegal to store gas in a high rise / flat / against terms of tennency agreement

Especially since greenfell

That and with no balcony you would need s flue to vent the combustion gases

I was thinking more mains gas supply not bottles, when my power goes out I still have a gas supply to my oven and hob however the fridge / freezer would need to have a continuously burning pilot light not one of the new electronic ignition systems unless a battery was available.

the majority of gas fridges these days work off main electricity, LPG gas and 12V batteries as they are designed for caravans and boats depending on where it was placed in the flat a flexible flue could be routed to a window when gas is required for operation and a battery for the ignition system.

another option for long term cooling might be a solar powered cool box, small but big enough for the essentials, if the power is out for any length of time most people run through the contents of the fridge first, cook any fresh meat etc. if the power was out for weeks on end the shops wont be stocking fresh food that needs refrigeration anyway if they're even open.

A small cool box or freezer with a small solar panel that would fit in your window might be a way forward..... from a quick look about the internet I came across the one on the link below, it only requires 80W which is one small solar panel that could fit in a window.

http://www.bimblesolar.com/offgrid/sola ... idge-PF166
It costs nearly a grand though. :shock:


I know its expensive, might get a cheaper one somewhere else but when you think it's free to run (can be used as a fridge or freezer) and affords you complete off grid security of any food you have.

the problem is this has to go into a flat with space constraints, tenancy constraints etc , you could devise a much cheaper set up in house without these constraints.
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Deeps
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Re: Flat power protection

Post by Deeps » Sun Feb 11, 2018 4:57 pm

xplosiv1 wrote:
I know its expensive, might get a cheaper one somewhere else but when you think it's free to run (can be used as a fridge or freezer) and affords you complete off grid security of any food you have.

the problem is this has to go into a flat with space constraints, tenancy constraints etc , you could devise a much cheaper set up in house without these constraints.
I guess it would depend on what you're prepping for but I'd get my spuds handed to me if I suggested to the missus that we spend that kind of money on a chest freezer. Especially when she's looking at getting a new(er) car and I'm trying to stall her. :lol:

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xplosiv1
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Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 2:12 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Flat power protection

Post by xplosiv1 » Sun Feb 11, 2018 5:06 pm

Deeps wrote:
xplosiv1 wrote:
I know its expensive, might get a cheaper one somewhere else but when you think it's free to run (can be used as a fridge or freezer) and affords you complete off grid security of any food you have.

the problem is this has to go into a flat with space constraints, tenancy constraints etc , you could devise a much cheaper set up in house without these constraints.
I guess it would depend on what you're prepping for but I'd get my spuds handed to me if I suggested to the missus that we spend that kind of money on a chest freezer. Especially when she's looking at getting a new(er) car and I'm trying to stall her. :lol:
I'd be getting the same treatment if I bought one too lol
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Stonecarver
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Joined: Tue Aug 15, 2017 4:32 pm
Location: Eastern Scotland

Re: Flat power protection

Post by Stonecarver » Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:42 pm

Thanks for ideas guys. Sure to pass them along
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featherstick
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Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 9:09 pm

Re: Flat power protection

Post by featherstick » Fri Feb 16, 2018 12:55 pm

Deeps wrote:
I keep some 2L bottles in the freezer to put in the top shelf of the fridge too, that should hopefully keep stuff in the fridge chilled in the event of a relatively short term outage. You can also insulate fridges/freezers with old duvets etc too.

A few 2l bottles of frozen water will keep a small freezer below freezing for 48 hours. Don't ask how I know this. :oops:

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