WEATHER AWARE :met office weather prepping launched

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Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 3652
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

WEATHER AWARE :met office weather prepping launched

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Fri Nov 23, 2018 9:40 pm

If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 3652
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: WEATHER AWARE :met office weather prepping launched

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Fri Nov 23, 2018 9:41 pm

Met Office
Barometer
Wet motorway with cars causing spray
Driving in severe weather

The Great British weather presents different challenges in different seasons. It's not just winter weather which can wreak havoc on the roads - even rain at any time of the year can be dangerous - in fact 9 out of 10 weather-related deaths and serious injuries on the roads take place in the rain. From high winds, strong sunlight and fog to snow and ice, all weathers can present different challenges both for keeping the travel networks open and for those navigating through the difficult conditions.

Useful contacts for rail, road, air and sea travel operators can be found here.

Here we provide advice from the experts at Highways England, RAC, and the Institute of Advanced Motorists. The most important thing to remember before setting off on any journey is to check the weather forecast and plan ahead.
Sections

Driving in rain, high winds and storms
Driving in mist and fog
Driving in snow and ice


Driving in storms, rain and high winds
Choices and planning ahead

Even moderate rain can reduce your ability to see and be seen. A good rule of thumb is ‘if it’s time for your wipers, it’s time to slow down’.
If heavy downpours are expected, avoid starting your journey until it clears.
If you can, choose main roads, where you are less likely to be exposed to fallen branches and debris and flooding.
Use dipped headlights if visibility is seriously reduced.
Gusts of wind can unsettle vehicles – grip your steering wheel firmly with both hands. This is particularly important when planning to overtake.
Keep an eye out for gaps between trees, buildings or bridges over a river or railway – these are some of the places you are more likely to be exposed to side winds. Ensure that you maintain enough room either side of your vehicle so you can account for it being blown sideways.
Roads will be more slippery than usual in wet weather – be sure to give yourself more time to react when approaching a hazard. Increase your following gap to at least four seconds from the moving traffic in front.
Keep your eyes peeled on the road at all times as spray from other vehicles can suddenly reduce your visibility. Remember it affects others too, so anticipate their actions and be prepared.

What to do when the road is flooded

Never drive through flood water. Just 30cm of water can float an average sized car – less if you have a small car and it’s impossible to tell the depth of wate rjust by looking at it.
The number one cause of death during flooding is driving through flood water. Don’t risk it. Turn around and find an alternative route.

Keep an eye out for cyclists, motorcyclists and pedestrians

Remember to give vulnerable road users including cyclists, motorcyclists and pedestrians more room than usual. They are more likely to be blown around by side winds – always keep a safe distance.


Driving in mist and fog
When should you use headlights in fog?

According to the Highway Code, you must use headlights when visibility is seriously reduced - generally when you cannot see for more than 100 metres.

Advice for how to drive in mist and fog from RAC

When there’s fog around, make sure you’re familiar with how to operate your front and rear fog lights.
If your car has automatic lights, remember to check the lights are on, as they may not be automatically activated in foggy conditions. However, do not use full beam lights, because the fog reflects the light back, reducing visibility even further.
Follow the ‘two-second rule’ to leave sufficient space between you and the car in front.
If visibility is very limited, wind down your windows at junctions and crossroads to allow you to listen out for approaching traffic. If you really cannot see, you should consider stopping until it is safe to continue.
If your car is fitted with air conditioning, use it, as it will stop the windows from misting up. Ensure the heater is set to windscreen de-misting and open all the vents.
If the fog is so severe that you’re struggling to see other vehicles, switch on your fog lights.

Read more about driving in mist and fog.


Driving in snow and ice

Always adjust your driving according to the conditions and plan your journey by checking the latest weather forecast. You can also look for clues on road conditions such as ice on the pavement or on your windscreen before you start your journey and take extra care.

Highways England and the governments of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland look after motorways and major A roads, and local authorities look after all the other roads, working as hard as they can to keep their networks clear during severe weather.

Read more - how do the gritters know when to go out?
Change your route if possible for better conditions

Stick to the main roads where you can. You should drive with care and respect the road conditions wherever you drive, but if you cannot avoid driving on a minor road, take extra care.
Only travel if really necessary. Snow ploughs are unable to get through if the road or motorway is full of stationary traffic, so do not make journeys unless completely necessary to give Highways England and local authorities the space they need to help you on your journey.
Avoid steep hills and exposed roads hills and exposed areas are likely to present more challenging driving conditions in snow and ice.

Make necessary preparations before you set off

Clear your windscreen of snow, frost or condensation. The Highway Code stipulates you must be able to see out of every glass panel in your vehicle.
Clear any snow off the roof of the vehicle before you drive away, otherwise you may cause snow to fall on your windscreen hampering your vision. Read about the dangers of driving with snow on your car from RAC.

Useful tips for driving in snow:

Accelerate gently, using low revs. You may need to take off in second gear to avoid skidding.
You may need 10 times the normal gap between your car and the car in front.
Try not to brake suddenly - it may lock up your wheels and you could skid further.
Be extra cautious at road junctions where road markings may not be visible.
Read more tips from RAC about driving in snow.

Be aware:

Look out for winter service vehicles spreading salt or using snow ploughs. They have flashing amber beacons and travel at slower speeds - around 40 mph. Stay well back because salt or spray can be thrown across the road. Do not overtake unless it is safe to do so - there may be uncleared snow on the road ahead.

Related

View of congested incoming traffic covered in layer of snow
Useful travel weather contacts
Driving coaches and trucks in severe weather
How do the road gritters know when to go out?

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If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 3652
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: WEATHER AWARE :met office weather prepping launched

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Fri Nov 23, 2018 9:42 pm

Met Office
Barometer
A torch on floor illuminating floorboards in a dark room
What to do in a power cut

If you experience a power cut you should contact the electricity Distribution Network Operator (DNO) that covers your area.

It's your Electricity Distribution Network Operator (DNO) who is responsible for maintaining physical electricity supplies to your home or business. DNOs own and operate the distribution network of towers and cables that bring electricity from the national transmission network to homes and businesses. They don't sell electricity to consumers, this is done by the electricity retailers whose name appears on your bill.

The electricity network operators have introduced 105 - to give you an easy-to-remember number to call that will put you through to the local people who can help during a power cut.

Alternatively you can find the details for all the electricity Distribution Network Operator companies on the Energy Networks Association postcode lookup tool.

For gas emergencies dial 0800 111999
Precautions to take and how to deal with a power cut

In the event of a power outage there are some simple precautions you can take to help best prepare and deal with the situation:

If electricity is crucial for any medical equipment you have, please contact your DNO at any time as they may be able to put you on their Priority Register (see below) for assistance during any power outage.
Make sure you have multiple torches along with extra batteries
Make sure you keep your mobile phone charged so you can make calls in case of an emergency
Keep fridges and freezers closed, with a blanket over as they will stay cold for many hours
Keep important documents safe and handy
Look out for elderly neighbours and ensure they are prepared for a possible power cut
Switch off appliances - turn off items such as irons, ovens, electric fires and fryers as they could pose a hazard if the power comes back on when you are not there

If your power goes off unexpectedly, check to see if your neighbours still have electricity. If their power is also off don't assume that the DNO has already been notified - always call to let them know.

If your neighbours still have power but your home doesn't, it's likely there is a problem with the fuses or trip switches in your home.
Help for older and disabled people in case of power cuts

Get yourself or someone you care for on the Priority Services Register in case of power cuts - this is a free service provided by water and power suppliers for older and disabled people, or if you depend on electricity to keep medical or mobility equipment running.


Related

Keeping your home warm in winter
Wet motorway with cars causing spray
Driving in severe weather

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© Crown copyright
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 3652
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: WEATHER AWARE :met office weather prepping launched

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Fri Nov 23, 2018 9:43 pm

Met Office
Barometer
How to prepare your small business for severe weather

Whether it’s wet, cold, windy or sunny, the UK weather is one of our most popular topics of conversation. And it’s only becoming more so as the weather becomes more unpredictable and extreme.

However, for small business, just talking about severe weather isn’t enough. They also need to prepare for the worst, in order to reduce the potential impact of a flood, storm or heavy snow on their business. A lack of personnel and resources may mean that small businesses can take longer to recover from damage caused by severe weather compared to a large employer. In worst-case scenarios this could result in a major loss or even business failure – with potentially life-changing consequences for owners and employees. Local communities are likely to also be affected due to reduced access to products or services.
Emergency plan

With small businesses making up 99.9% of businesses in the UK and employing 16.1 million people, severe weather represents a significant risk. Yet 43% of small businesses currently don’t have a business continuity, disaster recovery or crisis management plan in place. This means that when bad weather hits, it could have particularly devastating consequences. So what can small business owners do to limit the effects of severe weather on their business?

To help small businesses who may simply not know where to start, Business in the Community has created the 10 Minute Plan. The tool helps small businesses to develop a bespoke emergency plan, so they are better prepared for – and able to respond to and recover from – a range of emergencies, including extreme weather events. The 10 Minute Plan sets out in a step-by-step approach what small businesses need to take into account when developing their emergency plan, as well as a checklist of what the plan could include.
Would you be ready?

And of course, it isn’t just severe weather which poses a threat to small businesses. The Would you be ready? online Readiness Test helps small businesses to see how prepared they are for a range of situations, including a cyber attack and is full of simple and easy tips to help small businesses improve their preparedness..

With winter fast approaching, now is the time for small businesses to ensure they are ready for extreme weather conditions. By taking 10 minutes to assess the risks and reduce the impact these events could have, they can safeguard their assets and – if the worst happens – get back to business, back to profit and back to growth sooner.
Related

A torch on floor illuminating floorboards in a dark room
What to do in a power cut
What to do if you have a frozen or burst pipe
Pile of sandbags protecting gat of a house from flooding
What to do in a flood
Flooding - protecting your property and reacting to flood risk

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© Crown copyright
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 3652
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: WEATHER AWARE :met office weather prepping launched

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Fri Nov 23, 2018 9:43 pm

Met Office
Barometer
What to do if you have a frozen or burst pipe

If you spot that one of your pipes might be frozen, turn off your inside stop tap immediately. It might be under the kitchen sink, in an airing cupboard or under floorboards near the front door.
How and when to thaw frozen pipes

It's best to thaw out pipes slowly, by using a hairdryer on its lowest setting, hot water bottles or towels soaked in warm water. Do not use direct heat as this may cause permanent damage to the pipes and could also lead to a fire in the home.

Turn on nearby cold taps (keep the stop tap turned off) this will relieve pressure on the frozen pipe.
What to do if you have a burst pipe

Sometimes pipes freezing and thawing can cause them to burst. If this happens, turn off the mains water supply immediately by using the stopcock. This will stop any more water getting into the water pipes. If the burst pipe is on the main water system the rush of water will stop after a short while.

If the rush of water does not stop or there is still a constant run of water, the problem is probably on the cold water storage system. You will need to drain down the cold water storage tank which is usually located in the roof space.

Most importantly, if the worst happens, keep calm, do not panic and if you suspect you have frozen pipes contact your nearest WaterSafe plumber from the UK national accreditation scheme.
Tips to avoid problems in the future

Make sure you know where your stop tap is and check it’s working
If you are going away, leave your heating on and set the thermostat to 14 C
Make sure all roof and vulnerable pipes are insulated and your boiler is serviced
Make sure you have the name and telephone number of your nearest WaterSafe qualified plumber to hand. Keep it by the boiler or stop tap!
Get a neighbour to look in occasionally if you go away.

Find a plumber

If you need help to get your plumbing prepared for winter, or have a frozen or burst pipe, you can find a skilled plumber near you through the national accreditation scheme WaterSafe, which is backed by water companies in the UK and the Government’s water quality watchdog. Visit the WaterSafe website to find a plumber or winter advice or call 0333 207 9030.
Related

A torch on floor illuminating floorboards in a dark room
What to do in a power cut
How to get your home and property winter ready
Clearing your path or driveway - the Snow Code
Flooding - protecting your property and reacting to flood risk

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© Crown copyright
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 3652
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: WEATHER AWARE :met office weather prepping launched

Post by Yorkshire Andy » Fri Nov 23, 2018 9:44 pm

Met Office
Barometer
Flooding - protecting your property and reacting to flood risk

Preparing for a flood could save your family, possessions and livelihood.

Flooding is dangerous and can happen very quickly. The effects can be devastating. There are a number of things you can do to prepare for flooding to keep yourself and your family safe. Find out if your home is at risk, sign up for flood warnings and be ready to take action.

5.2 million homes and businesses in England are at risk of flooding – is yours?

There are simple things you can do now to help reduce the impact of flooding on your home.

Start by taking three simple steps to help protect you, your family and your home from the devastating effects of flooding:

Check if you are at risk of flooding using a simple postcode search.

Sign up for free flood warnings: if you live in an area at risk of flooding you could get free flood warnings direct to your mobile, home phone, or email.

Know what to do in a flood: download the Environment Agency’s ‘Prepare Act Survive’ flood guide or visit https://flood-warning-information.servi ... in-a-flood

Preparing for flooding

There’s lots of useful information on preparing for flooding on gov.uk and also on the Property Resilience Forum’s website.

Knowing what to do in a flood could save you thousands of pounds in damages and even save your life. The Environment Agency’s ‘Prepare Act Survive’ flood guide will help you to know what to do in case of flooding.

If you live in an area at risk of flooding, prepare a bag of essential items now to take with you if you have to leave your home. Keep this in a safe place. You could include things like spare medication, glasses, clothing, important documents and contact numbers.

Create a checklist of things to do to protect your family such as turning off the electricity and gas to prevent a fire. You could also add important contact details such as the number of your insurance company.

Think about getting insurance to protect your home or business against flooding. In most cases, flood insurance is part of your buildings and contents insurance. If you are finding it difficult to get your property insured for flooding, the National Flood Forum may be able to help.

Think about making your property resilient to flooding. To reduce flood damage lay tiles instead of carpets, move electrical sockets up the wall and fit non-return valves. If you know you live in an area at risk of flooding you could consider installing flood products. you can:

get advice from the National Flood Forum about how to protect your property and how much this will cost.
find flood protection products and services at Blue Pages.
find information about grants and funding, flood resilience and the BRE flood resilient house.

Recovering after a flood

If you have had to leave your home, make sure you check with the emergency services that it’s safe to return.

If you have been flooded, contact your insurance company and follow their advice. If you haven’t got insurance the National Flood Forum can offer help and support. Call them on 01299 403055 or visit their website. Take advice from specialists before starting repairs to your property. Most of the repair work after flooding will need to be undertaken by professionals appointed by your insurers.

Flood water contains harmful substances such as sewage, chemicals and animal waste which could make you unwell. If you come into contact with flood water wash your hands thoroughly. When cleaning your home after a flood always wear gloves, a face mask and sturdy footwear. For more information about how to safely clean up your home, visit the Public Health England web page.Your local authority can advise you on how to dispose of used sandbags or flood damaged furniture and fittings.

The Environment Agency has specially trained Flood Support Officers across the country who provide information and advice during and after floods. If you have been affected by flooding, contact the Environment Agency for details of local community drop-in sessions to get information, advice and support.

Think about repairing your property to make it resilient to flooding. To reduce flood damage you could take measure such as laying tiles instead of carpets, moving electrical sockets higher up the walls and fitting non-return valves. Suppliers of flood products and services can be found on the Bluepages.

[Click to enlarge image]

A household saved by a flood barrier (with thanks to Fluvial Innovations)

[Click to enlarge image]



Flood Control Barrier (with thanks to Flood Control International)
Flooding - Sophie's story
Related

Pile of sandbags protecting gat of a house from flooding
What to do in a flood
A torch on floor illuminating floorboards in a dark room
What to do in a power cut
How to get your home and property winter ready
Keeping your home warm in winter
Wet motorway with cars causing spray
Driving in severe weather

Contact Us Accessibility Legal Privacy policy Cookie policy

Powered by Google TranslateTranslate
© Crown copyright
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine

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