how do you prep for international travel

How are you preparing
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rik_uk3
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Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by rik_uk3 » Sun Jun 01, 2014 7:23 pm

J23 wrote:
rik_uk3 wrote:Sorry Briggs, who were you replying to there chap?
he replied me as I always laugh at people with paranoia :D
"Your never alone with paranoia" as the old joke says lol

We've seen an economic collapse in the likes of Spain and Greece recently and this is really as bad as it will get, certainly in Europe so IMHO I see no need to cancel my trips. Something like a volcano blow as seen in Iceland could ground aircraft but this is where the extra dosh in your pocket comes into play, you'd not starve to death.

Over the years I've met a good few folk stuck in an airport because of delayed flights with nothing in their pocket and after even only 24 hours they feel peed off. Carry that extra few quid and your problems don't erupt.
Richard
South Wales UK
Retired, spending the children's inheritance.

J23
Posts: 156
Joined: Fri Feb 28, 2014 11:23 am

Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by J23 » Sun Jun 01, 2014 7:39 pm

rik_uk3 wrote:
J23 wrote:
rik_uk3 wrote:Sorry Briggs, who were you replying to there chap?
he replied me as I always laugh at people with paranoia :D
"Your never alone with paranoia" as the old joke says lol

We've seen an economic collapse in the likes of Spain and Greece recently and this is really as bad as it will get, certainly in Europe so IMHO I see no need to cancel my trips. Something like a volcano blow as seen in Iceland could ground aircraft but this is where the extra dosh in your pocket comes into play, you'd not starve to death.

Over the years I've met a good few folk stuck in an airport because of delayed flights with nothing in their pocket and after even only 24 hours they feel peed off. Carry that extra few quid and your problems don't erupt.
I never said you have paranoia. Your approach seems to be healthy and normal. You prepp with head without all this "I must build helicopter in my 1 bed flat to be ready to runaway"
I just took mortgage an I know that till I pay it off there will be few economic crisis as they appear every 7 years on average

parian
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Location: south wales

Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by parian » Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:55 pm

thanks for the replies guys.

I don't suffer from paranoia either, the question is a legit one.
I spend a lot of time working in the states two weeks or three weeks at a time, our customers employees are encouraged to bring a bag with them to work containing essentials to get them home safely , money in small bills a knife or multi tool, some food and water, a torch with spare batteries stout shoes or boots and clothing for the time of year,add meds and a small first aid kit.
This pack is no different to what I carry to and from work and have found all or part of it useful on several occasions.
last november while working in the states we had a freak snow storm which took down the power lines and blocked the road to the hotel, vending machines out no hot water or food and a 7 mile hike to the hotel, my little bag came in very handy.



Ian

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Bad Wombat
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Location: Worcestershire, UK

Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by Bad Wombat » Sun Jun 01, 2014 10:39 pm

Prepping for international travel? I think it's a good question. I just got back from 3 weeks in Norway and didn't have any idea how to prep for anything unusual. On the up side my location was about as secure as anything you could imagine. Even though, I took several credit and debit cards, and quite a lot of cash. I was planning on going walking when I was there so had a good pair of boots, SAK, emergency sleeping bag and blankets with me, but that was about it. In the case of a major incident the idea of getting stuck abroad for an extended period is a real downer.

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Briggs 2.0
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Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by Briggs 2.0 » Mon Jun 02, 2014 8:50 am

parian wrote:thanks for the replies guys.

I don't suffer from paranoia either, the question is a legit one.
I spend a lot of time working in the states two weeks or three weeks at a time, our customers employees are encouraged to bring a bag with them to work containing essentials to get them home safely , money in small bills a knife or multi tool, some food and water, a torch with spare batteries stout shoes or boots and clothing for the time of year,add meds and a small first aid kit.
This pack is no different to what I carry to and from work and have found all or part of it useful on several occasions.
last november while working in the states we had a freak snow storm which took down the power lines and blocked the road to the hotel, vending machines out no hot water or food and a 7 mile hike to the hotel, my little bag came in very handy.

Ian
You may already have these preps so I apologise if I'm doubling up.

A map with alternate routes marked back to your hotel. Mark key points on the map, such as hospitals, police stations, service stations, etc, etc, and put their full address and phone details on the back of the map, and their numbers in your phone. Keep the number for taxi firms in your phone. If there is a bus route, get the timetable which probably also has a route map. Clearly buses and taxis are unreliable if the roads are blocked by snow, but if it was snow season and you may have a fairly long trek home - I'd be thinking about packing some goretex socks, gloves, hat and outer layers to go with my boots.

A neat gizmo I've always got on my pack for when I'm working at night is a Quiqlite torch. You may want to check those out, the flashing beacon is very good especially if you're walking along a dark road.

I'm not paranoid either, I just always have kit on me so that I can get home :-)
Off-Grid & Living Outdoors

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bladefalcon
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Location: Area 12 (Gwent)

Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by bladefalcon » Thu Jun 05, 2014 9:31 pm

Language. A basic few words in the native language can go a long way, especially in a rural area where the inhabitants are less likely to "spik eengleesh"!

Add to that a mini translation dictionary and you have assured(albeit slow) communication with the locals; gaining information on current affairs. Many european countries are very community based, if you offer to help you'd end up mucking in with them and probably be taken very good care of!

In the very worst case scenario, a dictionary provides a source of information to begin learning the language if you are stuck out there for a long period of time!

Can you imagine the absolute helplessness we all feel when immersed in a foreign language for the first time, multiplied by 100 thanks to a disaster or economic troubles fuelling paranoia and short tempers?!

A week's hard work on a website such as Duolingo can give you the basic skeleton of a language and a bit of an ear for it. Babbel is another free program, covering more languages. It is more vocabulary based so great for fleshing out your knowledge. Vocab packages can be stored on device memory, allowing use offline. I have always used it faithfully on flights, to combat boredom and give me a bit of an edge morale wise! :D
Cymru
(Area 12)
:)

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Wingfoot
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Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by Wingfoot » Thu Jun 05, 2014 10:05 pm

One item I like to have along on any trip abroad is the U-tag.

Its an electronic dog tag.

It stores any important medical history you may have & should you be unlucky enough to end up in hospital & unable to communicate the doctors can access the relevant information via the tag.

It can display the information in many different languages.

Best of all you can also store your own files to the tag as well.

I have added scans of my families passports & my driving licence in case they are lost or stolen as well as emergency contact numbers for my bank & credit cards along with my travel insurance documents.

The manufacturer's website...
http://www.utagice.com/acatalog/Purchas ... wgodvEEAAw

Cheaper here...
http://www.amazon.co.uk/UTAGDOGMC-UTAG- ... B001AR8F8G

Wf
Si vis pacem, para bellum

ticklemonkey
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Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by ticklemonkey » Fri Jun 06, 2014 1:38 pm

Sak in main luggage and the rest in hand. Take, full change of clothes for when main bag gets lost/delayed, hygiene supplies including toothbrush liquidsin clear bag, travel board game, CASH and cards, medication and extras, snacks, water filter/bottle (empty) the 'pure hydration' type, shades, compass, pens, notebook, map of area, iPad type thing,
Travel insurance cert
Passport
Boarding pass
Lightweight goretex jacket
These things spring to mind as I sit by the swimming pool... 8-)
In a 5.11 covert sml rucksack.

ticklemonkey
Posts: 34
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2013 10:16 am

Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by ticklemonkey » Fri Jun 06, 2014 1:39 pm

Ah, head torch and hand torch with spare batteries.

Stasher
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Re: how do you prep for international travel

Post by Stasher » Tue Jul 01, 2014 6:12 pm

The money thing is dead on. In all the years I've travelled I've only once had to use my emergency USD. But blimey did I need it. I do not like to think about the consequences of failing to have the cash with me at that time.

Anyway, in addition to my A4 sheet of 'things to take on holiday' I always like to know EXACTLY where the embassy/consulate is. If I'm in the city I like to do a drive by. If I'm not, I look at the map until my eyes bleed. I also keep the contact number with me at all times.

The no. 1 prep when travelling abroad is listen to the advice of locals and if anything looks like it's going to kick off. Get out, get out and FAST, dump money on the table for food /drinks and leave. No discussion, no, oooh, wots going on. Leave. NOW. And don't go down back alleys ;)

Sometimes when you feel safe and secure you're actually being stupid and putting yourself (and loved ones) into a terribly vulnerable position simply because for that moment you have let the idea that this foreign country has a culture, tradition, law, respect and behaviour similar to your own take hold.

It's not. It's not. Just remember you had to get a visa ie, you had to get permission to enter the country and it's fab. It's a lovely country, it's diverse and amazing and so different to home, err, that's right. It's different. Normal rules do not apply. Err, sorry, appear to have ranted a bit here :oops:
Knowledge is power

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